Savory

Slow Roasted Lamb Shanks + Tips

Lamb

 

If you’re cooking for flavor, I believe time is your greatest advocate. I know a lot of people are getting into pressure cookers, or insta-pots, but there is something about the traditional way of cooking that won’t disappoint. Utilize time and allow simple ingredients to infuse your food, building upon itself minute after minute, hour after hour, incredible flavor.

Here are my tips for effortlessly adding tons of flavor and tenderness to your choice of protein. Let time do all the work!

  • Marinade in vinegar. This actually begins the ”cooking” process. No at this point your choice of protein is not in an oven, but by marinating your meat in vinegar, the digestive or breaking down process begins. The vinegar softens and tenderizes the meat without the risk of overcooking. This works wonders if you find yourself with a particularly tough cut of meat, but dont want to heat up the oven for 12 hours and end up with jerky.

 

  • Salt well in advance. This rule does not apply to all choices of protein. Chicken and Lamb do really well salted ahead of time where as steak and pork render more tender of a product when salted just before cooking. The salt on your lamb shanks will allow for your meat to retain moisture, the same way your body reacts to lots of salt by water retention, resulting in a melt in your mouth experience!

 

  • Braise or broil before beginning the slow cook. You want to ensure that all the delicious flavor you’ve worked so hard to culminate in your meat stays there. By braising or broiling the meat before it begins to cook, you will seal in the salt and vinegar, allowing them to work for your advantage during the cooking process.

 

  • Let your meat rest. The point of this is to allow the meat to cool down, so it can retain the liquid that is in the meat. When slicing into a hot piece of protein, you will notice the juices from that meat pouring out onto the surface of your block. That is because meat struggles to hold onto moisture at that temperature. By allowing your protein to cool, it will be able to maintain the moisture that got heated during the cooking process, resulting in a much more juicy product.

 

For this particular recipe:

  • Marinade the lamb shanks for 8 hours in Red Wine Vinegar and Salt. Adding herbs/seasonings at this time is also appropriate. (Thyme, Rosemary, Mustard, Harissa, Cumin to name a few.)
  • Broil the lamb at 450 degrees for about 15 minutes.
  • Turn the oven down to 300 degrees and cook covered for 3 hours. Be sure to keep some liquid in the pan to ensure the legs dont dry out. You can use additional vinegar here, or bone broth to infuse more flavor.
  • Let the lamb rest for 15 minutes before slicing.
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Savory

AIP Parsnip fries

French Fries

 

Its grilling season, and nothing completes an AIP salad and grilled protein like these parsnip fries. So easy, and actually preferred over potato fries by every single person I’ve made these for – you’ll be running back to the farmers market every week just to pick up parsnips.

Parsnips support your body in the way of a high fiber content, magnesium, folate and potassium. So important to get those minerals and nutrients through food, daily. And how delightful in the form of a baked, greasy, salty vegetable!

  • 2-3 Medium Parsnips
  • 4 tbsp Avocado Oil
  • 1 tsp Himalayan

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Chop your parsnips into similar sized sticks. Place your parsnips on a sheet pan, drizzle with oil and stir as to incorroporate all of the oil. Sprinkle with salt. You of course may add whatever herbs spices your heart desires.

Bake for 30-45 minutes based on how thick you cut your parsnips. Bring the temperature up to 500 and broil for 5-10 minutes, depending on how crispy you like your fries. We like ours on the crispy side!

Savory

Pulled Chicken Gizzards

gizzards

Pulled chicken gizzards. That’s right, not pulled pork, pulled gizzards. And these babies are glistening with fat and flavor! Today we’re going somewhere a little different. Organ meats are some of the most nutritionally dense foods you can eat. They have some of the highest concentration of your B vitamins, and your fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. Organ meats also contain elevated amonuts of minerals such as phosphorus, iron, copper, magnesium, iodine, calcium, potassium, sodium, selenium, zinc and manganese as well as essential amino acids.

Today, I’m working with chicken gizzards from a farm just a few miles from my house, you cant get more fresh than that! They were frozen, so I thawed them over night. Working with thawed meat allows for so much more flavor. Another important tool to implement with organ meats, or any tough meat for that matter, is to marinate it in vinegar. That will begin the break down, or ‘digestion’ process if you will – lending in a softer much more tender result. Helpful for those who have a tough time digesting protein. Its a beautifully effortless process!

The basic breakdown to achieve tender, flavorful, juicy, salty and fatty chicken gizzards that will have even your two year old begging for more? Here are my suggestions:

-Thaw completely overnight.
-Clean organ to its specified requirements
-Marinate In Apple Cider Vinegar and salt for at least 4 hours up to 24 hours. You dont need to cover the meat in vinegar, simply disperse it over the meat evenly. The vinegar will add SO much flavor to the meat. Tenderizing it and pulling out all its natural juices. You can add other seasonings here too. I kept it simple to start.
-Braise the meat. I began the braise with a few tbsp of red palm fruit oil. Once the initial frying was done, I added my flavor. Bone broth, or water if you have a histamine sensitivity, or an issue with SIBO/Candida. Chicken gizzards are fatty, but we like fat in our house so I added an additional 1/2 cup of butter (It was 3 lbs of gizzards) and my seasonings. You can season with whatever you want. I chose to go with Salt, Rosemary, Thyme, Majorium, Oregano, Parsley, Garlic and Onion. After an hour or two, it should be soft enough to pull. You can continue to let it cook as long as you’d like – keeping in mind to replace any broth/water lost through steam. You dont want your meat to dry out!

Now to go make some tortillas and some homemade quac. 🙂